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How To Work Out Final Marjon Bachelor Degree Classification

Updated: Apr 23, 2020

This short guide explains how final marks and classifications are calculated at Marjon but in a more manageable way. It also includes visual representations and downloadable templates to help you easily work out what final overall mark and classification you can expect to graduate with.

As an undergraduate student nearing the end of your challenging three years of study, you will inevitably be curious about what overall mark and classification you can expect to end your course with! Once you have all of your marks back, you can work this out for yourself – but you may soon realise that the university’s explanation of this process is difficult to interpret.


What Are The Classifications?


Final undergraduate degree marks and corresponding classifications are as follows:


70+ = First Class (1) 60-69 = Upper Second Class (2:1) 50-59 = Lower Second Class (2:2) 40-49 = Third Class (3) <40 = Fail


Remember – If your final mark is within 1% of a higher classification, then you will be awarded the higher classification.


What Is The University's Process For Awarding A Classification?


Your weighted marks (i.e. 60% for an essay and 40% for a presentation, etc.) from individual assignments are combined to form a module average for each module by the Module Assessment Boards. These marks are then forwarded to the Progression and Awards Board who confirm your final degree classification in accordance with university regulations.

These regulations have been in place since October 2013. This means that if you first registered before 1st Sep 2014 and your studies are uninterrupted, the Progression and Awards Board may consider the previous regulations and award you the higher classification if they calculate different results. However, if you took a break in your studies, then your results will be determined by the newer regulations.


How Is My Final Grade Calculated?


First of all, you must know your overall module marks (the average mark calculated from the weighted marks of your assignments in each module). Remember that all module marks will be rounded to the nearest integer, with any below –.5 being rounded down and those that are –.5 or above being rounded up.


Remember – your dissertation counts as two modules with equal scores (your final dissertation mark).


If your degree was a standard three-year Bachelor’s, then your final mark can be calculated as follows:


  1. Your marks from Year 1 do not count so we can ignore those.

  2. From Year 2 (Level 5), your two highest-scoring modules (or 40 credits) count twice and your remaining four modules (or 80 credits) count once.

  3. From Year 3 (Level 6), your four highest-scoring modules (or 80 credits) count three times and your remaining two modules (or 40 credits) count twice.

  4. The twelve original modules have now been doubled to 24. So, take the total of all your multiplied marks, then find the mean average by dividing by 24 to reveal your final overall degree mark.

  5. Work out your classification using the guide, above.


I have produced this diagram to explain this process in a more visual way to help you work out your final mark: Click here to download a blank copy of this diagram, to help you work out your final mark by filling in the blank spaces with your own scores.


What If I've Just Been Admitted To Study The 'Final Stage'?


If you have just been admitted to study the final stage, then only the marks from Year 3 will count toward your final mark and classification. This is worked out as follows:


  1. Your two highest-scoring modules (40 credits) count three times.

  2. Your next two best modules (40 credits) count twice.

  3. Your remaining two modules (40 credits) count once.

  4. The six original modules have been doubled to twelve. So, take the total of all your multiplied marks, then find the mean average by dividing by twelve to reveal your final overall degree mark. 

  5. Work out your classification using the guide, above.

I have produced this diagram to explain this process in a more visual way to help you work out your final mark: Click here to download a blank copy of this diagram, to help you work out your final mark by filling in the blank spaces with your own scores.


What If I've Done Extra Modules?


If you have done more than the required number of modules, then the marks from the compulsory modules will be considered first. Then your marks from your best-scoring optional modules (as long as they are associated with your final degree) are included up to the total credit requirement. Your other modules will be disregarded.


What If I Haven't Got Enough Credits?


In some cases, you may not be able to provide enough evidence to be given a classification: In other words, you have not completed enough modules. There may be many reasons for this, including illness, change in family circumstances, and so on. However, if the Progression and Awards Board believes that you would have qualified for your degree if such circumstances did not occur, then you may be recommended for an ‘unclassified Aegrotat award’. This is an ungraded award that can be offered to a candidate if they do not meet the requirements to graduate with a full degree.


 

Please be aware that this guide is only designed for undergraduate students studying at the University of St Mark & St John (Plymouth Marjon University). The way in which other universities calculate final marks and classifications may not be the same.


For further information, please refer to Marjon’s guide ‘Award Classifications’, which you can view here.

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